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Computational Methods in Econometrics

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Microeconometrics

Part of the book series: The New Palgrave Economics Collection ((NPHE))

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Abstract

In evaluating the importance and usefulness of particular econometric methods, it is customary to focus on the set of statistical properties that a method possesses — for example, unbiasedness, consistency, efficiency, asymptotic normality, and so on. It is crucial to stress, however, that meaningful comparisons cannot be completed without paying attention also to a method’s computational properties. Indeed the practical value of an econometric method can be assessed only by examining the inevitable interplay between the two classes of properties, since a method with excellent statistical properties may be computationally infeasible and vice versa. Computational methods in econometrics are evolving over time to reflect the current technological boundaries as defined by available computer hardware and software capabilities at a particular period, and hence are inextricably linked with determining what the state of the art is in econometric methodology.

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Hajivassiliou, V.A. (2010). Computational Methods in Econometrics. In: Durlauf, S.N., Blume, L.E. (eds) Microeconometrics. The New Palgrave Economics Collection. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230280816_3

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