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How Well Do We Know Ourselves?

  • Barry Turner
Part of the The Statesman’s Yearbook book series (SYBK)

Abstract

Nationalism is back in fashion. It is almost too easy to blame 9/11 but it is in the wake of that most notorious of terrorist outrages that countries boasting their international credentials have started looking in on themselves. From America to Japan and across Europe, there is talk of defining national identity in a way that excludes outsiders, the very opposite of that once praised internationalism that celebrates tolerance, diversity and freedom. Causes that used to be the preserve of eccentric fringe parties—discrimination against immigrants of a particular race or religion, for example—are now part of mainstream politics.

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References

  1. Elie Kedourie, Nationalism. Hutchinson, 1961Google Scholar
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  6. Outgrowing the Unions. A Survey of the European Union . The Economist, 25 Sept. 2004Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Turner

There are no affiliations available

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