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How to Manage Out-Migration of Medical Personnel from Developing Countries: The Case of Filipino and South African Nurses and Doctors Leaving for Saudi Arabia, the UK and the US

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Abstract

A shortage of medical personnel has become a critical problem for developing countries and hinders them from providing medical services to the poor. Two aspects of the issue are of vital importance, one related to the demand and the other to the supply of medical personnel.

Keywords

  • Saudi Arabia
  • Medical Personnel
  • Destination Country
  • Source Country
  • Medical Tourism

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2009 Institute of Developing Economies (IDE), JETRO

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Yamagata, T. (2009). How to Manage Out-Migration of Medical Personnel from Developing Countries: The Case of Filipino and South African Nurses and Doctors Leaving for Saudi Arabia, the UK and the US. In: Uchimura, H. (eds) Making Health Services More Accessible in Developing Countries. IDE-JETRO Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230250772_7

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