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Conclusions: Towards Transatlantic Democracy Promotion?

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Part of the Governance and Limited Statehood Series book series (GLS)

Abstract

With the end of the Cold War at the latest, democracy promotion has become a major foreign policy tool of international organizations as well as Western statecraft.1 As the introductory chapter of this volume points out, there are several reasons for this development. First, major powers have always tried to spread their own political, economic and social orders around the globe and to externalize their values. The US and Europe are no exceptions. With the systemic competition between Communism and liberal democracy over, democracy promotion has become even more significant in their respective foreign policies.

Keywords

  • European Union
  • Foreign Policy
  • Good Governance
  • Democratic Consolidation
  • Autocratic Regime

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2009 Thomas Risse

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Risse, T. (2009). Conclusions: Towards Transatlantic Democracy Promotion?. In: Magen, A., Risse, T., McFaul, M.A. (eds) Promoting Democracy and the Rule of Law. Governance and Limited Statehood Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230244528_9

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