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Situated Knowledge

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Abstract

The term “situated knowledge” has two quite distinct disciplinary connections. The first is with a long twentieth-century tradition in studies of knowledge that comes from the margins of society, from black feminist thought,1 from non-mainstream science,2 and from those outside accepted forms of social communication.3 The second connection is with the study of learning that takes place in the process of engaged observation and practice, such as craftwork in silver, or children’s acquisition of language,4 or more recently, computing skills. This latter use is tied closely to studies in tacit knowledge.5

Keywords

  • Tacit Knowledge
  • Situate Knowledge
  • Computing Skill
  • Legitimate Peripheral Participation
  • Disciplinary Field

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. Patricia Hill Collins, Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment (London: Routledge, 1990).

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  2. Sandra G. Harding, Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking from Women’s Lives (Milton Keynes: Open University Press, 1991).

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  3. Lorraine Code, Rhetorical Spaces: Essays on Gendered Locations (London: Routledge, 1995).

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  4. Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger, Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation, Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive & Computational Perspectives (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991).

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  5. Lynette Hunter, Critiques of Knowing: Situated Textualities in Science, Computing and the Arts (London: Routledge, 1999).

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© 2009 Lynette Hunter

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Hunter, L. (2009). Situated Knowledge. In: Riley, S.R., Hunter, L. (eds) Mapping Landscapes for Performance as Research. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230244481_23

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