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Rules of Origin, Local Content and Cumulative Local Content in East Asia: Application of an International Input-Output Analysis

  • Ikuo Kuroiwa
Part of the IDE-JETRO Series book series (IDE)

Abstract

Rules of origin (RoO) are an integral part of all trade rules. In the case of free trade agreements (FTAs), RoO determine the ‘nationality’ of a product, and only products that are considered to have originated in FTA member countries are eligible for preferential tariff concessions. Therefore, it is evident that RoO significantly influence the effectiveness of FTAs. In East Asia (especially for ASEAN countries and China), local content or cumulative local content have become the most important criteria for determining the origin of a product.

Keywords

Manufacturing Sector Intermediate Input Output Table Local Content Import Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Institute of Developing Economies (IDE), JETRO 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ikuo Kuroiwa

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