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Global Imperialism’s Second Wave

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Globalization
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Abstract

Like the first wave, the second wave of global imperialism was stimulated by a mix of political rivalries, ideological excuses, economic demands, and technological advances.1 Economic reasons were perhaps the most important—the need for cheap and secure sources of food, raw materials, and minerals, captive markets, and the imperative to offset the expanding power of one’s competitors. Nationalist rivalries and the prestige of empire were also important. Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli captured the Zeitgeist when he asked publicly in 1872:

whether you will be content to be a comfortable England, modeled and molded upon Continental principles…, or whether you will be a great country—an imperial country—a country where your sons, when they rise, rise to paramount positions, and obtain not merely the respect of their countrymen, but command the respect of the world.2

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Notes

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© 2010 William R. Nester

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Nester, W.R. (2010). Global Imperialism’s Second Wave. In: Globalization. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230117389_9

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