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Conflict Transformation Efforts in the Southern Philippines

  • Susan D. Russell
  • Rey Ty
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides insights into how the disciplines of anthropology and political science offer important ethnographic, cross-cultural, and holistic perspectives on conflict resolution and peace education. The elicitive approaches of both Paulo Freire and John Paul Lederach and their perspectives on conflict resolution and transformation techniques closely resonate with our project approaches. We illustrate these perspectives by offering examples from collaborative efforts that Northern Illinois University has undertaken in two capacity-building projects within civil society in the war-torn region of the southern Philippines. Our chapter reviews the state of conflict resolution within the broader field of anthropology and political science, how these frameworks are enacted in our programs, and their implications for peace education in higher education.

Keywords

Civil Society Conflict Resolution Peace Education Indigenous Youth Peace Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Candice C. Carter 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan D. Russell
  • Rey Ty

There are no affiliations available

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