Skip to main content

Toward a Pedagogy of Coalition

  • Chapter

Part of the Comparative Feminist Studies Series book series (CFS)

Abstract

In the very recent history of the academic institution where I have taught for the greater part of the last decade, a group of students of color and their white allies took over the president’s office to protest institutional racism. The official response from the president, delivered at a Campus Community Committee meeting, was a written document, which addressed the students’ demands primarily by reframing them within the college’s “history” of successes in the area of diversity. Both before and after the occupation of the president’s office, student protestors organized informal forums, open to the entire community, to discuss institutional racism. These meetings were packed with students, whose competing identities, interests, needs, and desires came roiling to the surface in the form of often heated and contentious debate. The fact that no administrator, let alone the president, attended any of these discussions constitutes a disavowal of both the pervasive presence of racism on campus, and the experiences and knowledges that informed the students’ actions and efforts toward social change. At the same time, it raises serious questions, many of which have been raised by the editors of this anthology, about the place, or lack thereof, for critical and dissenting voices within the educational institution.

Keywords

  • Minority Student
  • White Student
  • Racial Identity
  • Consensus Model
  • Ideal Community

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Academic thinkers mediate the cultural politics of difference and have it end up recodified as “multiculturalism.”

—Norma Alarcón

[I]t may be through contradiction that we begin to address the systematic inequalities built into cultural institutions, economies, and geographies, and through conflict that we call attention to the process through which these inequalities are obscured by pluralist multiculturalism.

—Lisa Lowe

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/9780230107250_2
  • Chapter length: 27 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   59.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-230-10725-0
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   74.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Works Cited

  • Alarcón, Norma. “Conjugating Subjects in the Age of Multiculturalism.” Gordon and Newfield 127–148.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anzaldúa, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. San Francisco: Spinsters/Aunt Lute, 1987.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— Making Face/Haciendo Cara: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 1990.

    Google Scholar 

  • Appiah, Kwame Anthony, and Henry Louis Gates, Jr., eds. Identities. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bhabha, Homi. The Location of Culture. New York: Routledge, 1994.

    Google Scholar 

  • Butler, Judith. “Collected and Fractured: Response to Identities.” Appiah and Gates 439–447.

    Google Scholar 

  • Colby College Catalogue. 1998.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cotter, William. “Response to the April 14 Report of the Task Force and the Two April Memoranda on Racial Concerns at Colby.” 30 April 1999.

    Google Scholar 

  • Elshtain, J. B. “The Social Relations of the Classroom: A Moral and Political Perspective.” Telos 97(1976): 110.

    Google Scholar 

  • “Final Report of the Colby College Trustee Commission on Multicultural and Special Interest Housing.” March 1994.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frankenberg, Ruth. “When We Are Capable of Stopping, We Begin to See: Being White, Seeing Whiteness.” Thompson and Tyagi 3–17.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1993.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gallegos, Bernardo. “Memory, Location, and Theory in Postcolonial Education.”First Annual Colby Education Conference. Colby College. 1 May 1999.

    Google Scholar 

  • Giroux, Henry. A Pedagogy and Politics of Hope: Theory, Culture, and Schooling. Boulder: Westview Press, 1997.

    Google Scholar 

  • Giroux, Henry A., and Peter McLaren, eds. Between Borders: Pedagogy and the Politics of Cultural Studies. New York: Routeldge, 1994.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gordon, Avery, and Christopher Newfield, eds. Mapping Multiculturalism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, Stuart. “The Local and the Global: Globalization and Ethnicity.” McClintock et al.173–187.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haymes, Stephen. “White Culture and the Politics of Radical Difference: Implications For Multiculturalism.” Sleeter and McLaren 105–127.

    Google Scholar 

  • hooks, bell. Black Looks: Race and Representation. Boston: South End Press, 1992.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— Teaching to Transgress: Education and the Practice of Freedom. New York: Routledge, 1994.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kincheloe, Joe L., et al. White Reign: Deploying Whiteness in America. New York: St. Martins Press, 1998.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lipsitz, George. The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: How White People Profit From Identity Politics. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1998.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lowe, Lisa. “Imagining Los Angeles in the Production of Multiculturalism.” Gordon and Newfield 413–434.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics. Durham: Duke University Press, 1996.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lugones, María. “Playfulness, ‘World’-Traveling, and Loving Perception.” Anzaldúa, Making Face/Haciendo Caras 390–402.

    Google Scholar 

  • Maher, Frances, and Mary Kay Thompson Tetreault. “They Got the Paradigm and Painted It White: Whiteness and Pedagogies of Positionality” Kincheloe et al. 137–158.

    Google Scholar 

  • McClintock, Anne, Aamir Mufti, and Ella Shohat, eds. Dangerous Liaisons: Gender, Nation, and Post Colonial Perspectives. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.

    Google Scholar 

  • McLaren, Peter. “Multiculturalism and the Post-Modern Critique: Toward a Pedagogy of Resistance and Transformation.” Giroux and McLaren 192–222.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— “White Terror and Oppositional Agency: Towards a Critical Multiculturalism.” Sleeter and McLaren 33–70.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. “On Race and Voice: Challenges for Liberal Education in the 1990’s.” Giroux and McLaren 145–166.

    Google Scholar 

  • Moraga, Cherríe and Gloria Anzaldúa, eds. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. New York: Kitchen Table Press, 1981.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reagon, Bernice Johnson. “Coalition Politics: Turning the Century.” Smith, Barbara 356–368.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sandoval, Chela. “US Third World Feminism: The Theory and Method of Oppositional Consciousness in the Post Modern World.” Genders 10 (1991): 1–24.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sleeter, Christine. “Reflections on My Use of Multicultural and Critical Pedagogy When Students Are White.” Sleeter and McLaren 415–437.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sleeter, Christine E., and Peter McLaren, eds. Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy, and the Politics of Difference. New York: State University of New York Press, 1995.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, Barbara, ed. Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology. New York: Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, 1983.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, Sidonie, and Julia Watson, eds. Introduction. De/Colonizing the Subject: The Politics of Gender and Autobiographical Practices. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1992, xiii–xxxi.

    Google Scholar 

  • Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. “Acting Bits/Identity Talk.” Appiah and Gates 147–180.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stam, Robert. “Multiculturalism and the Neoconservatives.” McClintock et al. 188–203.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, Becky and Sangeeta Tyagi, eds. Names We Call Home: Autobiography and Racial Identity. New York: Routledge, 1996.

    Google Scholar 

  • Weiss, Penny A. and Marilyn Friedman, eds. Feminism and Community. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995.

    Google Scholar 

  • West, Cornel. Keeping Faith: Philosophy and Race in America. New York: Routledge, 1993.

    Google Scholar 

  • Young, Iris Marion. “The Ideal Community and the Politics of Difference.” Weiss and Friedman 233–257.

    Google Scholar 

  • —— Justice and the Politics of Difference. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1990.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2002 Amie Macdonald and Susan Sánchez-Casal

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Sasaki, B. (2002). Toward a Pedagogy of Coalition. In: Macdonald, A.A., Sánchez-Casal, S. (eds) Twenty-First-Century Feminist Classrooms. Comparative Feminist Studies Series. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230107250_2

Download citation