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Teaching (About) Genocide

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Part of the Comparative Feminist Studies Series book series (CFS)

Abstract

A while back I was assessing my teaching during the academic year that just ended in order to bring some closure to it, as well as create an opening into the new one about which I was beginning to think. I was focusing in particular on my genocide course in preparation for a course on Hannah Arendt since, for me, both were connected; this led me further into a questioning of modern and postmodern Western ethico-politics and what ethico-politics may mean in light of the shoa1 or Nazi Judeocide2 and other genocidal events that seem so very entwined with Western modernity and postmodernity.3 These include, for example, the murderous annihilation of indigenous peoples in the process of European incursion into and conquest of the Americas, the greedy cruel indifference toward the death of millions in the process of the European enslavement of Africans, the dispossession and slaughter of Armenians by the Turks while the Turks were consolidating a nation-state that was intended to replace a fallen empire, and the mass politicides in Cambodia and Argentina. Thinking about my genocide course, and in conjunction with it about other courses that I teach, I was again aware that there is something about those of my courses that thematize oppression or violence, and especially “extreme” or “limit cases” of it, that tends to engender resistance to rather than a deep engagement with the course materials in a fair number of undergraduate students.

Keywords

  • Traumatize Event
  • Psychological Trauma
  • Intelligible Speech
  • Critical Pedagogy
  • Monthly Review

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2002 Amie Macdonald and Susan Sánchez-Casal

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On, BA.B. (2002). Teaching (About) Genocide. In: Macdonald, A.A., Sánchez-Casal, S. (eds) Twenty-First-Century Feminist Classrooms. Comparative Feminist Studies Series. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230107250_10

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