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Defending Dialectics: Rethinking the Neo-Marxist Turn in Critical Education Theory

  • Wayne Au
Chapter
Part of the Marxism and Education book series (MAED)

Abstract

Of all of Marx’s extensive writing on political economy and philosophy, there is perhaps no other single segment that has produced as much theoretical wrangling, conflict, and discussion about the relationship between capitalism and social structures as that contained in the “Preface to a Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy,” where Marx (1968b) writes:

In the social production of their life, [humans] enter into definite relations that are indispensable and independent of their will, relations of production which correspond to a definite stage of development of their material productive forces. The sum total of these relations of production constitutes the economic structure of society, the real foundation, on which rises a legal and political superstructure and to which correspond definite forms of social consciousness. The mode of production of material life conditions the social, political and intellectual life process in general. It is not the consciousness of [humans] that determines their being, but, one the contrary, their social being that determines their consciousness. (P. 183)

Keywords

Capitalist Production Economic Base Educational Theory Relative Autonomy Marxist Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sheila Macrine, Peter McLaren, and Dave Hill 2010

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  • Wayne Au

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