Skip to main content

Peace With Honor: Ending the Vietnam War

  • Chapter

Abstract

The situation in Vietnam was a top priority for Richard Nixon upon taking office in 1969. Although a longtime supporter of efforts to contain communism in Southeast Asia, Nixon knew if elected he would need to end the American military commitment to South Vietnam because of rising domestic dissatisfaction with the war. Whether or not he had a secret plan to end the war, Nixon wanted to conclude American involvement honorably to preserve the nation’s credibility in dealing with its allies and enemies. Relying on his reputation as an anticommunist, he was able to deflect questions about specific policy initiatives on Vietnam during the campaign. Nixon’s self-imposed moratorium on the issue, intended to allow President Johnson room to maneuver at the peace talks, also meant he did not have to explain his ideas about a settlement.

Keywords

  • Foreign Policy
  • Human Event
  • National Review
  • Silent Majority
  • American Troop

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/9780230102200_3
  • Chapter length: 23 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   59.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-230-10220-0
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. John Lewis Gaddis, Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security Policy (New York: Oxford University Press, 1982), 238–243.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Melvin Small, “The Election of 1968,” Diplomatic History 28 (September 2004): 513

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  3. David Greenberg, Nixon’s Shadow (New York: W.W.Norton, 2003), 77–79.

    Google Scholar 

  4. Jeffrey Kimball, Nixon’s Vietnam War (Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1998), 50, 66–67, 72; Walter Isaacson, Kissinger: A Biography (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1992), 151–152.

    Google Scholar 

  5. H.R. Haldeman, The Ends of Power (New York: Times Books, 1978), 82–83.

    Google Scholar 

  6. William Bundy, A Tangled Web: The Making of Foreign Policy in the Nixon Years (New York: Hill and Wang, 1998), 57–67

    Google Scholar 

  7. Henry A. Kissinger, “Beyond the Old Left and the New Right,” Foreign Affairs 78 (May/June 1999): 100–101.

    Google Scholar 

  8. James Kilpatrick, “Voices Raised in Support of Nixon as Drums Roll,” Star, 10/14/1969, A11; R. Emmett Tyrrell, Jr., “The Moratorium: Some Observations,” The Alternative 3 (November–December 1969): 2

    Google Scholar 

  9. M. Stanton Evans, “Administration Politics: Conservatives Get the Words; the Liberals Get All the Action,” Battle Line 4 (January 1970): 7–9.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Frank Johnson, “Foreign Policy: The President’s Weakness in that He Is Not Sure of Himself,” Battle Line 4 (January 1970): 9–13.

    Google Scholar 

  11. HR HD, 4/28/1970; Kimball, Nixon’s Vietnam War, 197–198, 210–212; Henry A. Kissinger, White House Years (Boston: Little Brown, 1979), 492

    Google Scholar 

  12. Richard M. Nixon, “Address to the Nation on the Situation in Southeast Asia,” 4/30/1970, Public Papers of the President, Richard Nixon, 1970 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1971).

    Google Scholar 

  13. William F. Buckley, Jr., “The Cambodian Incursion,” 5/5/1970, Inveighing We Will Go (New York: Putnam, 1974), 137–139.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Bundy, A Tangled Web, 205–206; Kimball, Nixon’s Vietnam War, 146–147, 230–236; Tad Szulc, “How Kissinger Did It: Behind the Vietnam Cease-Fire Agreement,” Foreign Affairs 15 (Summer 1974): 24–25.

    Google Scholar 

  15. Szulc, “How Kissinger Did It,” 59–63; Richard M. Nixon, “Address to the Nation Announcing Conclusion of an Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam,” 1/23/1973, Public Papers of the President, Richard Nixon, 1913 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975).

    Google Scholar 

  16. William Schneider, Jr., “A National Security Agenda for the Second Administration,” The Alternative 6 (December 1972): 11–12.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Copyright information

© 2010 Sarah Katherine Mergel

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Mergel, S.K. (2010). Peace With Honor: Ending the Vietnam War. In: Conservative Intellectuals and Richard Nixon. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230102200_3

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230102200_3

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, New York

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-349-38253-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-230-10220-0

  • eBook Packages: Palgrave History CollectionHistory (R0)