Skip to main content
  • 89 Accesses

Abstract

Cape Verde is a country affluent in oral traditions. These include proverbs, riddles, stories, songs, as well as popular beliefs, myths, superstitions, and games, which can be heard and seen when walking through the streets. One of the most popular oral traditions is the batuku (Creole) (batuque in Portuguese) song and dance (Hurley-Glowa, 2001). Men might clap their hands to the sound of the drum in the batuku dance or play an accompanying instrument, but it is primarily a woman’s dance (Máximo, 1998).

Its significance lies in the dancing gestures and the word meanings, including satires and complaints; things that otherwise wouldn’t be said.

—(Jandira)

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 39.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 54.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 54.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Authors

Copyright information

© 2009 Katherine Carter and Judy Aulette

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Carter, K., Aulette, J. (2009). Batuku Dance as Resistance. In: Cape Verdean Women and Globalization. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230100596_7

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics