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Consumers’ Attitudes Regarding Non-deceptive Counterfeit Brands in the UK and China

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Part of the Journal of Brand Management: Advanced Collections book series (JBMAC)

Abstract

It has been well established that counter feit brands are those bearing a trade mark that is identical to, or indistinguishable from, a trade mark registered to another party and infringes on the rights of the holder of the trade mark.1–5 Counterfeits are available quite extensively, and with a number of forms of deception. For some counterfeit brands, consumers do not know that they are not genuine when they are purchased (deceptive counter feits); while for others, consumers are fully aware that they are buying nongenuine brands (nondeceptive counterfeits).6 Their quality varies. Some counterfeit products are so good that even the brand owners are not able to distinguish them from genuine products without the help of laboratory tests, while others are very poor and dangerous.7

Keywords

  • Purchase Intention
  • Consumer Research
  • Trade Mark
  • Brand Equity
  • Brand Management

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bian, X., Veloutsou, C. (2017). Consumers’ Attitudes Regarding Non-deceptive Counterfeit Brands in the UK and China. In: Balmer, J.M.T., Chen, W. (eds) Advances in Chinese Brand Management. Journal of Brand Management: Advanced Collections. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-352-00011-5_15

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