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The Desire for a Poly-Asian Continental Film Movement

  • Aaron Han Joon Magnan-ParkEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

At present, Asia is the only continent that has not yet produced an inclusive, representational, and emboldening continental film movement to present the concerns that unify its people. At best, Pan-Asian cinema is a regional framework limited to East Asian nations who share economic clout along with a shared Confucian legacy. However, it excludes the rest of greater Asia. The concept of Poly-Asian cinema is introduced as a means to invoke the need for a continent-embracing film movement despite the historical absence of a unified Asian continental past based on a shared definition of what constitutes “Asia” be it via political, religious, linguistic, ethnic, or cultural unity. Instead of merely replicating what has already been accomplished by European art cinema, New Latin American cinema, or Pan-African cinema, perhaps Poly-Asian cinema could create a continental consciousness through which the seventh art advances a cinema of enlightenment.

Keywords

Continental consciousness European art cinema International film festivals New Latin American cinema Pan-African cinema Pan-Asian cinema Poly-Asian continental film movement 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I wish to thank Robert Cagle, Heo Chul, Dina Iordanova, Anne Magnan-Park, Gina Marchetti, Aboubakar Sanogo, See Kam Tan, and Kasey Man Man Wong for their support and comments on earlier versions of this chapter.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Hong KongHong KongHong Kong

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