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What Is Crime, What Is Deviance? Reflections on the Development and Contemporary Relevance of Sumner’s Notion of Social Censure

Abstract

That there are no universally accepted definitions of the terms ‘crime’ and ‘deviance’ within the field of criminology may surprise those with only a passing acquaintance with it. Instead, those engaged in the criminological endeavour are faced with a wealth of debate over what intuitively seem like straightforwardly ‘common sense’ notions.

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Moxon, D. (2017). What Is Crime, What Is Deviance? Reflections on the Development and Contemporary Relevance of Sumner’s Notion of Social Censure. In: Amatrudo, A. (eds) Social Censure and Critical Criminology. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95221-2_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-349-95221-2_11

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