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Critical Race Theory: Origins and Varieties

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Part of the Marxism and Education book series (MAED)

Abstract

In this chapter, I begin by briefly tracing the relationship between postmodernism, transmodernism and Critical Race Theory (CRT) with respect to the voices of the Other. I go on to examine CRT’s historical origins in Critical Legal Studies (CLS) noting how CRT was in part a response to the perception that CLS analyses were too class-based and underestimated ‘race’, which for Critical Race Theorists is the major form of oppression in society. I conclude by underlining the pivotal relationship between CRT and the law by outlining a pioneering article by two of CRT’s most influential writers in the field of education.

Keywords

Indigenous People Critical Race Theory Model Minority White Supremacy Critical Legal Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of East LondonLondonUK

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