Comparing News Diets, Electoral Choices and EU Attitudes in Germany, Italy and the UK in the 2014 European Parliament Election

Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Political Sociology book series (PSEPS)

Abstract

Based on original post-electoral surveys held after the 2014 European elections on representative samples of citizens with internet access in Italy, Germany and the UK, we explore the relationship between the exposure to different sources of information and attitudinal and behavioural dimensions of Euroscepticism. We distinguish respondents in occasional media users, prevalently traditional, prevalently digital and ‘omnivores’. We expect to find a relation between different news diets and confidence in EU institutions, electoral abstention and vote for Eurosceptic parties. Our analyses show that omnivores are more trustful of the EU and less likely to abstain and that digital univores are more likely to vote for Eurosceptic parties.

Keywords

2014 EP elections News diets EU attitudes Electoral abstention Eurosceptic parties 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Scuola Normale SuperioreInstitute of Humanities and Social SciencesFlorenceItaly

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