Trajectories of Women’s Citizenship from Socialism to the Bosnian War

  • Maria-Adriana Deiana
Chapter
Part of the Rethinking Peace and Conflict Studies book series (RCS)

Abstract

This chapter offers a historical overview of the legacies shaping women’s citizenship practices in Post-Dayton Bosnia-Herzegovina through a wider time-frame that takes into consideration the reverberations of state socialism and post-1989 political transformation as mediated through the specific regional context of the Former Yugoslavia.

Keywords

Socialism Gender Citizenship Yugoslavia Nationalism Conflict 

References

  1. Albanese, Patricia. 2001. Nationalism, War, and Archaization of Gender Relations in the Balkans. Violence Against Women 7: 999–1023.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Baker, Catherine. 2016. Gender in Twentieth-Century Eastern Europe and the USSR. Palgrave Macmillan. Google Scholar
  3. Batinić, Jelena. 2001. Feminism, Nationalism, and War: The ‘Yugoslav Case’ in Feminist Texts. Journal of International Women’s Studies 3: 1–23.Google Scholar
  4. Bonfiglioli, Chiara. 2015. Gendered Citizenship in the Global European Periphery: Textile Workers in Post-Yugoslav States. Women’s Studies International Forum 49: 57–65.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.07.004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bonfiglioli, Chiara, Katja Kahlina, and Adriana Zaharijević. 2015. Transformations of Gender, Sexuality and Citizenship in South East Europe. Women’s Studies International Forum 49: 43–47.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.07.009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Campbell, David. 1998. National deconstruction: Violence, Identity, and Justice in Bosnia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  7. Cockburn, Cynthia. 1998. The Space Between Us: Negotiating Gender and National Identities in Conflict. London and New York: Zed books.Google Scholar
  8. ———. 2002. Women’s Organization in the Rebuilding of Bosnia-Herzegovina. In  The Postwar Moment: Militaries, Masculinities and International Peacekeeping, eds. Cockburn, Cynthia, and D. Žarkov, 68–84. London: Lawrence and Wishart.Google Scholar
  9. ———. 2007. From Where We Stand: War, Women’s Activism and Feminist Analysis. London and New York: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  10. Cockburn, Cynthia, and Dubravka Žarkov. 2002. The Postwar Moment: Militaries, Masculinities and International Peacekeeping, Bosnia and the Netherlands. London: Lawrence and Wishart.Google Scholar
  11. Cohn, Carol. 2013. Women and Wars: Contested Histories, Uncertain Futures. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  12. Dević, Ana. 1997. Redefining the Public-Private Boundary: Nationalism and Women’s Activism in Former Yugoslavia. Anthropology of East Europe Review 15: 45–61.Google Scholar
  13. Drakulić, Slavenka. 1993. Women and the New Democracy in the Former Yugoslavia. In Gender Politics and Postcommunism: Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, ed. N. Funk and M. Mueller. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  14. Einhorn, Barbara. 1993. Cinderella Goes to Market: Gender, Citizenship, and Women’s Movements in East Central Europe. London and New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  15. ———. 2006. Citizenship in an Enlarging Europe Towards Gender Equity? Citizenship in an Enlarging Europe, 171–190. London: Springer.Google Scholar
  16. Einhorn, Barbara, and Charlotte Sever. 2003. Gender and Civil Society in Central and Eastern Europe. International Feminist Journal of Politics 5: 163–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Elshtain, Jean Bethke. 1987. Women and War. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  18. Enloe, Cynthia. 2000. Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women’s Lives. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  19. Fagan, Adam. 2005. Civil Society in Bosnia Ten Years After Dayton. International Peacekeeping 12: 406–419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Funk, Nanette, and Magda Mueller. 1993. Gender Politics and Post-communism. Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  21. Gal, Susan, and Gail Kligman. 2012. The Politics of Gender After Socialism: A Comparative-Historical Essay. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Galligan, Yvonne, Sara Clavero, and Marina Calloni. 2007. Gender Politics and Democracy in Post-socialist Europe. Opladen: Barbara Budrich.Google Scholar
  23. Hansen, Lene. 2013. Security as Practice: Discourse Analysis and the Bosnian War. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  24. Helms, Elissa. 2003a. Gendered Visions of the Bosnian Future: Women’s Activism and Representation in Post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina. University of Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  25. ———. 2003b. Women as Agents of Ethnic Reconciliation? Women’s NGOs and International Intervention in Postwar Bosnia–Herzegovina. Women’s Studies International Forum 26: 15–33. Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. ———. 2013. Innocence and Victimhood: Gender, Nation, and Women’s Activism in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  27. ———. 2015. Transformations of Gender, Sexuality and Citizenship in Southeast Europe: New Lenses for New, and Not So New, Times. Women’s Studies International Forum 49: 101–103.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.08.007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Husanović, Jasmina. 2000. Practice with No Language: A Reflection of the ‘Gender Scene’ in Bosnia in a Sarajevo Workshop. International Feminist Journal of Politics 3: 124–130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. ———. 2009. The Politics of Gender, Witnessing, Postcoloniality and Trauma: Bosnian Feminist Trajectories. Feminist Theory 10: 99–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Jancar-Webster, Barbara. 1999. Women in the Yugoslav National Liberation Movement. na.Google Scholar
  31. Karam, Azza. 2000. Women in War and Peace-Building: The Roads Traversed, the Challenges Ahead. International Feminist Journal of Politics 3: 2–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Kesić, Obrad. 1999. Women and Gender Imagery in Bosnia: Amazons, Sluts, Victims, Witches, and Wombs. In Gender Politics in the Western Balkans: Women and Society in Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States, ed. Sabrina P. Ramet, 187–202. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Korac, Maja. 2003. Women Organizing Against Ethnic Nationalism and War in the Post-Yugoslav States.  In Giles, W. (ed.) Feminists Under Fire: Exchanges Across War Zones, ed. Wenona Giles, 25–33. Canada: Between the Lines.Google Scholar
  34. ———. 2006. Gender, Conflict and Peace-Building: Lessons from the Conflict in the Former Yugoslavia. Women’s Studies International Forum 29: 510–520. Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Kumar, Krishna. 2001. Women and Civil War: Impact, Organizations, and Action. Boulder and London: Lynne Rienner.Google Scholar
  36. Lukić, Jasmina, Joanna Regulska, and Darja Zaviršek. 2006. Women and Citizenship in Central and Eastern Europe. Burlington: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  37. Milić, Andjelka. 1993. Women and Nationalism in the Former Yugoslavia. In Gender Politics and Post-Communism: Reflections from Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, ed. N. Funk and M. Mueller, 109–122. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  38. Mostov, Julie. 2000. Sexing the Nation/Desexing the Body: Politics of National Identity in the Former Yugoslavia. In Gender Ironies of Nationalism, ed. T. Mayer, 89. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  39. Papić, Žarana. 1999. Women in Serbia: Post-communism, War and Nationalist Mutations. In Gender Politics in the Western Balkans: Women and Society in Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States, ed. Sabrina P. Ramet, 153–170. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  40. Pavlović, Tatjana. 1999. Women in Croatia: Feminists, Nationalists, and Homosexuals. In Gender Politics in the Western Balkans: Women and Society in Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States, ed. Sabrina P. Ramet, 131–152. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Pejić, Bojana. 2009. Proletarians of All Countries, Who Washes Your Socks? Equality, Dominance and Difference in Eastern European Art. na.Google Scholar
  42. Pupavac, Vanessa. 2005. Empowering Women? An Assessment of International Gender Policies in Bosnia. International Peacekeeping 12: 391–405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Ramet, Sabrina P. 1999. In Tito’s Time. In Gender Politics in the Western Balkans: Women and Society in Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States, ed. Sabrina P. Ramet, 89–106. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  44. ———. 2010. Gender Politics in the Western Balkans: Women and Society in Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav Successor States. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Rener, Tanja, and Mirjana Ule. 1998. Nationalism and Gender in Post-socialist Societies. In Women, Ethnicity and Nationalism: The Politics of Transition, ed. Rick Wilford and Robert L. Miller, 120–32. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  46. Slapšak, Svetlana. 1997. Nationalist and Women’s Discourse in Post-Yugoslavia. New York: Routlegde.Google Scholar
  47. ———. 2001. The Use of Women and the Role of Women in the Yugoslav War. In Gender, Peace and Conflict, ed. Inger Skjelsbaek and Dan Smith, 161–183. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  48. Walsh, Martha. 2000. Aftermath: The Role of Women’s Organizations in Postconflict Bosnia and Herzegovina. Center for Development Information and Evaluation. Washington, DC: U.S. Agency for International Development.Google Scholar
  49. Wibben, Annick T.R. 2016. Researching War: Feminist Methods, Ethics and Politics. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  50. Woodward, Susan L. 1995. Socialist Unemployment: The Political Economy of Yugoslavia, 1945–1990. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  51. Zaharijević, Adriana. 2015. Dissidents, Disloyal Citizens and Partisans of Emancipation: Feminist Citizenship in Yugoslavia and Post-Yugoslav Spaces. Women’s Studies International Forum 49: 93–100.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wsif.2014.07.002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Zajović, Staša. 1997. In Her Own Name (Cassandra’s Principle). In Women and the Politics of Peace: Contributions to a Culture of Women’s Resistance, ed. Biljana Kašić, 31–34. Zagreb: Centre for Women’s Studies.Google Scholar
  53. Žarkov, Dubravka. 2007. The Body of War: Media, Ethnicity, and Gender in the break-up of Yugoslavia. Durham: Duke University press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria-Adriana Deiana
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Law and GovernmentDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

Personalised recommendations