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Student and Supervisor Experiences of Learning and Teaching Conversation Analysis and Discursive Psychology for Autism Spectrum Disorder Focused Research: A Reflective Approach

  • Cordet Smart
  • Katie Denman
Chapter
Part of the The Language of Mental Health book series (TLMH)

Abstract

Smart and Denman provide invaluable guidance for research students and early career researchers on how to get the most out of their supervisory experience when developing a discursive project examining autism. Based on their own experiences as supervisor and supervisee, they draw out how students and supervisors can make the most from the resources they have access to, the types of projects that might be produced, and reveal similarities and differences between the student’s and supervisor’s perspectives. Finally, they draw attention to key ‘learning thresholds’ that students might experience when using a discursive approach, leading to students feeling lost, particularly around conducting analysis and integrating methodological and applied assumptions. They consider techniques for getting through these moments and achieving successful completion of the research project.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Antaki, C. (Ed.). (2011). Applied conversation analysis: Intervention and change in institutional talk. Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  2. Billig, M. (2013). Learn to write badly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Denman, K., Smart, C., Dallos, R., & Levett, P. (2016). How families understand their child’s behaviour while on the waiting list for a diagnosis of autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi: 10.1007/s10803-016-2873-7
  4. Pollock, C., & Auburn, T. (2013). Laughter and competence: Children with severe autism using laughter to joke and tease. In P. Glenn & E. Holt (Eds.), Studies of laughter in interaction (pp. 135–160). London: Bloomsbury Academic.Google Scholar
  5. Potter, J. (2012). Discourse analysis and discursive psychology. In H. Cooper (Ed.), APA handbook of research methods in psychology, Quantitative, qualitative, neuropsychological, and biological (Vol. 2, pp. 111–130). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cordet Smart
    • 1
    • 2
  • Katie Denman
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Psychology, Plymouth UniversityPlymouthUK
  2. 2.CEDAR, Exeter UniversityExeterUK
  3. 3.Plymouth Hospitals NHS TrustPlymouthUK

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