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The Political Representation of Women over Time

Part of the Gender and Politics book series (GAP)

Abstract

Hughes and Paxton map trends in women’s political representation from 1945 to 2015. While an upward trajectory is clear, there is significant variation across countries. In some countries, such as Sweden, South Africa, and Rwanda, women have made remarkable progress in their political representation. In other countries, the struggle for equal representation proceeds slowly. Within and between countries, some populations, religions, and governments remain openly hostile to the notion of women in politics. Based on these differences, Hughes and Paxton identify and describe four basic paths to women’s increased representation over time: (1) No Change, (2) Incremental Gains, (3) Fast-Track Growth, and (4) Plateau.

Keywords

  • Fast Growth Track
  • Incremental Gain
  • Gender Quotas
  • Union Of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR)
  • Plateau Country

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

The authors contributed equally to this chapter. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation (SES-0549973).

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Fig. 3.1
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Hughes, M.M., Paxton, P. (2019). The Political Representation of Women over Time. In: Franceschet, S., Krook, M., Tan, N. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Women’s Political Rights. Gender and Politics. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-59074-9_3

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