Memory-wounds

  • Raluca Soreanu
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Soreanu discusses ‘memory-wounds’ as ‘wounds-toward-memory’, marking the psyche’s capacity to be affected. The chapter shows how Ferenczi pluralises the psychoanalytic conception of repetition and offers a rereading of Nachträglichkeit, the complicated temporality of ‘deferred action’ in Freud, where a psychic event emerges from the interaction effects between several distinct temporalities. Soreanu discusses the Ferenczian idea of the ‘identification with the aggressor’ and she describes its various psychic ‘moves’ in a phenomenological manner. Among the psychic fragments resulting from traumatic splitting there is the ‘teratoma’, a dead twin-inside, and perhaps a repository of a ‘mad’ part of the superego. The chapter thus offers an important contribution to trauma theory.

References

  1. Avello, J. J. (1998). Metapsychology in Ferenczi: Death instinct or death passion? International Forum of Psychoanalysis, 7, 229–234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Balint, M. (1968). The basic fault. London: Tavistock Publications.Google Scholar
  3. Baraitser, L. (2017). Enduring time. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  4. Bateson, G. (1979). Mind and nature: A necessary unity. New York: Dutton.Google Scholar
  5. Benjamin, J. (2018). Beyond doer and done to: Recognition theory, intersubjectivity and the third. New York/London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Birksted-Breen, D. (2003). Time and the Après-coup. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 84, 1501–1515.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Borossa, J. (2014). Ferenczi’s ethics of our time: The possibility of being alongside. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 74, 349–356.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Bragin, M. (2007). Knowing terrible things: Engaging survivors of extreme violence in treatment. Clinical Social Work Journal, 35(4), 229–236.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Castoriadis, C. (1987). The imaginary institution of society. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  10. Castoriadis, C. (1989b). The state of the subject today. Thesis Eleven, 24, 5–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Dahl, G. (2010). The two time vectors of Nachträglichkeit in the development of ego organization: Significance of the concept for the symbolization of nameless traumas and anxieties. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 91, 727–744.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Erős, F. (2014). Freedom and authority in the Clinical Diary. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 74(4), 367–380.Google Scholar
  13. Faimberg, H. (2005). The telescoping of generations: Listening to the narcissistic links between generations. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  14. Faimberg, H. (2007). A plea for a broader concept of Nachträglichkeit. The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 76, 1221–1240.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Ferenczi, S. (1908a). Psycho-analysis and education. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 280–290). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  16. Ferenczi, S. (1908b). The analytic conception of the psycho-neuroses. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psycho-analysis (trans: Suttie, J. I., pp. 15–30). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  17. Ferenczi, S. (1909). Introjection and transference. First contributions to psycho-analysis (trans: Jones, E., pp 35–93). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  18. Ferenczi, S. (1912c). Transitory symptom-constructions during the analysis. First contributions to psycho-analysis (trans: Jones, E., pp. 193–212). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  19. Ferenczi, S. (1920). Psycho-analytical observations on tic. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psycho-analysis (trans: Suttie, J. I., pp. 142–174). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  20. Ferenczi, S. (1921). The symbolism of the bridge. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psycho-analysis (trans: Suttie, J. I., pp. 352–356). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  21. Ferenczi, S. (1924). Thalassa: A theory of genitality (trans: Bunker, H. A.). Albany: The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 1938.Google Scholar
  22. Ferenczi, S. (1925). Contra-indications to the ‘active’ psycho-analytical technique. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psycho-analysis (trans: Suttie, J. I., pp. 217–230). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  23. Ferenczi, S. (1926). The problem of acceptance of unpleasant ideas–advances in knowledge of the sense of reality. Further contributions to the theory and technique of psycho-analysis (trans: Suttie, J. I., pp. 366–379). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  24. Ferenczi, S. (1928). The elasticity of psycho-analytic technique. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 87–101). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  25. Ferenczi, S. (1929a). The principle of relaxation and neocatharsis. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E.). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  26. Ferenczi, S. (1929b). The unwelcome child and his death instinct. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 102–107). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  27. Ferenczi, S. (1930a). Autoplastic and alloplastic adaptation. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., p. 221). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  28. Ferenczi, S. (1930b). Each adaptation is preceded by an inhibited attempt at splitting. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., p. 220). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  29. Ferenczi, S. (1930c). On the analytic construction of mental mechanism. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 221–223). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  30. Ferenczi, S. (1930d). Trauma and striving for health. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 230–231). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  31. Ferenczi, S. (1930e). Fantasies on a biological model of super-ego formation. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 227–230). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  32. Ferenczi, S. (1931a). Child-analysis in the analysis of adults. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 126–142). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  33. Ferenczi, S. (1931b). The birth of intellect. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 244–246). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  34. Ferenczi, S. (1931c). On the revision of the interpretation of dreams. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 238–243). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  35. Ferenczi, S. (1931d). Trauma and anxiety. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 249–250). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  36. Ferenczi, S. (1932a). The clinical diary of Sándor Ferenczi (trans: Balint, M. & Jackson, N. Z.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
  37. Ferenczi, S. (1932b). On shock. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 253–254). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  38. Ferenczi, S. (1932c). Accumulatio Libidinis. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., p. 257). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  39. Ferenczi, S. (1932d). Infantility resulting from anxiety concerning real tasks. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 264–265). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  40. Ferenczi, S. (1932e). The two extremes: Credulity and scepticism. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 263–264). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  41. Ferenczi, S. (1933b). The confusion of tongues between adults and the child. Final contributions to the problems and methods of psycho-analysis (trans: Mosbacher, E., pp. 156–167). London: Karnac, 1994.Google Scholar
  42. Fletcher, J. (2013). Freud and the scene of trauma. New York: Fordham University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Frank, C. (2015). On the reception of the concept of the death drive in Germany: Expressing and resisting an ‘evil principle’? International Journal of Psycho-analysis, 96, 425–444.Google Scholar
  44. Frankel, J. (1998). Ferenczi’s trauma theory. American Journal of Psycho-analysis, 58(1), 41–61.Google Scholar
  45. Frankel, J. (2002). Exploring Ferenczi’s concept of identification with the aggressor: Its role in trauma, everyday life, and the therapeutic relationship. Psycho-analytic Dialogues, 12(1), 101–139.Google Scholar
  46. Frankel, J. (2015). The persistent sense of being bad: The moral dimension of the identification with the aggressor. In A. Harris & S. Kuchuck (Eds.), The legacy of Sándor Ferenczi: From ghost to ancestor (pp. 204–222). London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  47. Freud, S. (1905). Three essays on the theory of sexuality. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 7 (1901–1905): A case of hysteria, three essays on sexuality and other works (pp. 125–243). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  48. Freud, S. (1911). Formulations on the two principles of mental functioning. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 12 (1911–1913): Case history of Schreber, papers on technique and other works (pp. 213–226). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  49. Freud, S. (1920). Beyond the pleasure principle. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The standard edition of the complete psychological works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 18 (1920–1922): Beyond the pleasure principle, group psychology and other works (pp. 1–64). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  50. Freud, A. (1936). The ego and the mechanisms of defence. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  51. Green, A. (1996). On private madness. London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  52. Groddeck, G. (1923). The book of the it (trans: Collins, V. M. E.). New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company.Google Scholar
  53. Guattari, F. (2011). The machinic unconscious: Essays in schizoanalysis (trans: Adkins, T.). Los Angeles: Semiotext(e).Google Scholar
  54. Gurevich, H. (2016). Orpha, orphic functions, and the orphic analyst: Winnicott’s ‘regression to dependence’ in the language of Ferenczi. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 76(4), 322–340.Google Scholar
  55. Haraway, D. J. (1976). Crystals, fabrics, and fields: Metaphors of organicism in twentieth-century developmental biology. New Haven/London: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  56. Harris, A. (2015). ‘Language is there to bewilder itself and others’: Theoretical and clinical contributions of Sabina Spielrein. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 63(4), 727–767.Google Scholar
  57. Kerz-Rühling, I. (1993). Nachträglichkeit. Psyche-Z Psychoanal, 47, 911–933.Google Scholar
  58. Klein, M. (1933). The early development of conscience in the child. In The writings of Melanie Klein (Vol. 1, pp. 248–257). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  59. Klein, M. (1946). Notes on some schizoid mechanisms. In The writings of Melanie Klein (Vol. 3, pp. 1–24). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  60. Klein, M. (1955). On identification. In The writings of Melanie Klein (Vol. 3, pp. 141–175). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  61. Klein, M. (1958). On the development of mental functioning. In The writings of Melanie Klein (Vol. 3, pp. 236–246). London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  62. Klooger, J. (2009). Castoriadis: Psyche, society, autonomy. Leiden/Boston: Brill.Google Scholar
  63. Laplanche, J. (1987). Nouveaux fondements pour la psychanalyse. Paris: PUF.Google Scholar
  64. Laplanche, J. (1998). Notes sur l’après-coup. Paper presented at the Conference on psychoanalytical intracultural and intercultural dialogue. International Psychoanalytical Association, Paris, July 27–29.Google Scholar
  65. Laplanche, J., & Pontalis, J.-B. (1968). Fantasy and the origins of sexuality. International Journal of Psycho-analysis, 49, 1–18.Google Scholar
  66. Lénárd, K., & Tényi, T. (2003). Ferenczi’s concept on trauma, connected with the Katonadolog – ‘Soldiers can take it’ concept. International Forum of Psycho-analysis, 12(1), 22–29.Google Scholar
  67. Mbembe, A. (2001). On the postcolony. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  68. Miller, A. (2008). The drama of the gifted child: The search for the true self. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  69. Nguyen, L. (2012). Psychoanalytic activism: Finding the human, staying human. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 29(3), 308–317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Oliner, M. (2013). ‘Non-represented’ mental states. In H. B. Levine, G. S. Reed, & D. Scarfone (Eds.), Unrepresented states and the construction of meaning: Clinical and theoretical contributions (pp. 152–171). London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  71. Rand, N., & Torok, M. (1997). Questions for Freud: The secret history of psychoanalysis. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  72. Roussillon, R. (2011). Primitive agony and symbolization. London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  73. Soreanu, R. (2016). Ferenczi’s times: The tangent, the segment, and the meandering line. American Imago, 73(1), 51–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Soreanu, R. (2017). Something was lost in Freud’s Beyond the pleasure principle: A Ferenczian reading. American Journal of Psycho-analysis, 77(3), 223–238.Google Scholar
  75. Spielrein, S. (1912). Destruction as the cause of coming into being. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 39(155–186), 1994.Google Scholar
  76. Spillius, E. (2007). Encounters with Melanie Klein: Selected papers of Elizabeth Spillius. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  77. Stanton, M. (1990). Sándor Ferenczi: Reconsidering active intervention. London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
  78. Summers, F. (2008). Theoretical insularity and the crisis of psycho-analysis. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 25, 413–424.Google Scholar
  79. Thomä, H., & Cheshire, N. (1991). Freud’s Nachträglichkeit and Strachey’s ‘deferred action’: Trauma, constructions and the direction of causality. The International Review of Psycho-analysis, 18, 407–427.Google Scholar
  80. Young-Bruehl, E. (2011). The trauma of lost love in psycho-analysis. In S. Akhtar & M. K. O’Neil (Eds.), On Freud’s ‘Beyond the pleasure principle’ (pp. 250–264). London: Karnac.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raluca Soreanu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial StudiesBirkbeck CollegeLondonUK

Personalised recommendations