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Symbols

  • Raluca Soreanu
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Soreanu traces Sándor Ferenczi’s conception of the symbol and shows its relevance for the social domain. The symbolic here maintains its connection to materiality and to the body. By developing a ‘vocabulary of pleasure’, Ferenczi pluralises the Freudian conception of the ‘drives’. To Ferenczi’s vocabulary, Soreanu adds the pleasure of analogy, which she sees doubly relational: the pleasure of establishing relations between a set of relations. Taking steps away from the Freudian insistence on processes of identification in making sense of groups and collectives, Soreanu argues that there are other underexplored kinds of ‘glue’ that make the social bond hold. Furthermore, drawing on Ferenczi’s little known idea of utraquism, Soreanu discusses the ‘logic of analogy’ as an epistemological idea.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raluca Soreanu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial StudiesBirkbeck CollegeLondonUK

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