The “Newer Ideals” of Jane Addams’s Progressivism: A Realistic Utopia of Cosmopolitan Justice

  • Molly Cochran
Chapter
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan History of International Thought book series (PMHIT)

Abstract

Jane Addams, in both her thought and activism during the Progressive era, was focused on human problems at both local and global levels and asked of each level what a democratic attitude of radical social justice could bring to felt indeterminacies. She employed a philosophical method associated with American pragmatism, made her own as a relational and feminist approach—inseparable from her lived experience as a woman and advocate of social reform domestically and internationally. The historical context of the Progressive era and Addams’s experience of it, her part in the American Settlement movement and her leadership of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom are discussed to illuminate her human-centered, democratic social approach to international relations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Molly Cochran
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social ScienceOxford Brookes UniversityOxfordUK

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