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John Dewey: A Pragmatist’s Search for Peace in the Aftermath of Total War

  • Charles F. Howlett
Chapter
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan History of International Thought book series (PMHIT)

Abstract

Disillusioned and dismayed at the failure of Wilsonian progressive ideals supporting World War I, John Dewey converted his energies toward achieving a peaceful democratic world order. He became actively involved in the 1920s Outlawry of War crusade, which sought to outlaw war as an instrument of national policy. Although the crusade culminated with the signing of the 1928 Pact of Paris, Dewey was dismayed that it did not fulfill his own progressive hopes for full citizen participation as part of a global democratic mandate. Still, Dewey continued to press for public engagement on behalf of world peace as the 1930s witnessed the rise of military dictatorships in Europe and the Far East. Dewey, in terms of foreign policy issues, tied his pragmatic philosophy to progressive ideals on behalf of internationalism and world peace between the world wars.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles F. Howlett
    • 1
  1. 1.Molloy CollegeRockville CentreUSA

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