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An Introduction

  • Andy Bain
Chapter

Abstract

This first chapter is an introduction to the book. It contextualizes the discussion to follow and sets out the argument for the continued need to develop our individual and service understanding of such an important and fast changing area. The chapter provides a short outline of the historical nature of policing, and their position as local and national agencies of state control, to support the community. In the final section the chapter provides the reader with an outline of the chapters to follow and how this will help to inform their own knowledge and understanding of this important topic.

Keywords

Policing futures Technology Community policing 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Open Access This chapter is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Criminal JusticeUniversity of Mount UnionAllianceUSA

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