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Democracy Is Coming

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Globalization and Democracy in Southeast Asia

Part of the book series: Frontiers of Globalization ((FOG))

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Abstract

In the 1990s democracy was the dominant imaginary of politics. A global trend toward democracy was celebrated, heralded at world summits, prominent in the discourse of transition in Eastern Europe and institutionalized as part of international development policy where good governance became a condition of foreign aid. The worldwide scope of democracy was widely heralded. ‘No doubt, the defining concept of the 1990s is democracy. Like Coca Cola, democracy needs no translation to be understood virtually everywhere’ (Norton 1993, p. 208).

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The notion of the deep state derives from the Middle East, notably the Makzhen in Morocco. Governments change but the enduring constellation of power clustered around the monarchy does not. See, for example, Kausch (2008) and Hashas (2013).

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Nederveen Pieterse, J. (2016). Democracy Is Coming. In: Banpasirichote Wungaeo, C., Rehbein, B., Wun'gaeo, S. (eds) Globalization and Democracy in Southeast Asia. Frontiers of Globalization. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-57654-5_2

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