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Theriocide and Homicide

  • Piers Beirne
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Green Criminology book series (PSGC)

Abstract

Theriocide refers to those diverse human actions that cause the deaths of animals. Like the killing of one human by another (e.g. homicide, infanticide and femicide), a theriocide may be socially acceptable or unacceptable, legal or illegal. It may be intentional or unintentional. It may involve active maltreatment or passive neglect. Theriocides may occur one-on-one, in small groups or in large-scale social institutions. The numerous sites of theriocide include one-on-one acts of cruelty and neglect; state theriocide; factory farming; hunting and blood sports; abduction and kidnapping (‘trafficking’ in wildlife); vivisection; militarism and war; pollution; and human-induced climate change. Inevitably, the chapter leads to a shocking question: is theriocide murder?

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Piers Beirne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of CriminologyUniversity of Southern MainePortlandUSA

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