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On Affect, Dancing and National Bodies

Abstract

The chapter proposes to look at the connection between dance performances, the identification of these movements as national and feelings of comfort and discomfort through a conceptual lens of affect. Through an analysis of female dancing in Azerbaijan that unpacks the ways in which feelings of national belonging and alienation emerge in moments of bodily encounters, the chapter makes the affective dimensions of banal nationalism explicit. Following feminist accounts of Spinozist-Deleuzian affect and informed by an autoethnographic research methodology, Militz focuses on how bodily movements and sensations activate national categorisations. Through a vignette from her field research the author accounts for the ways in which her own positionality and bodily experiences produce national categorisations and constitute her experiences of national belonging and alienation. She concludes that disclosing the affective dimensions of banal nationalism helps to understand how feelings of national belonging emerge and persist even if national representations remain absent.

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Notes

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    All names have been changed.

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Correspondence to Elisabeth Militz .

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Militz, E. (2017). On Affect, Dancing and National Bodies. In: Skey, M., Antonsich, M. (eds) Everyday Nationhood. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-57098-7_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-57098-7_9

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