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From Early Exit to Postponing Pension: How the Dutch Polder Model Shapes Retirement

Abstract

The Netherlands have been known for their early exit culture. In recent years the retirement age and the labour market participation of older workers have successfully been reversed. Several measures increased workers’ need to stay in the labor market longer to fulfill their pension requirements: Occupational pension funds changed from a pay-as-you-go to a capital-funded system and the Dutch government made early retirement fiscally less attractive. Workers’ participation is maintained through collective agreements that define the implementation of human resource practices and employability-enhancing practices in companies. Moreover, employers’ contributions in training and development funds emphasize their role for training and skilling. Thus, collaboration between social partners and the government, i.e. the so-called Dutch polder model, has arguably shaped retirement in the Netherlands.

Keywords

  • Early Retirement
  • State Pension
  • Occupational Pension
  • Early Exit
  • Workplace Characteristic

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fleischmann, M., Koster, F. (2016). From Early Exit to Postponing Pension: How the Dutch Polder Model Shapes Retirement. In: Hofäcker, D., Hess, M., König, S. (eds) Delaying Retirement. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56697-3_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56697-3_8

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