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Determinants of Retirement and Late Careers in Estonia

Abstract

Estonia is an extremely fascinating case study for investigating the determinants of retirement. It has been shown to be one of the EU countries where the structure and size of the working age population are likely to be most problematic. Nevertheless, it is already now a forerunner in the employment rate among the elderly in Europe. The aim of this chapter is to analyze institutional conditions affecting employment and the move to retirement in Estonia during recent decades in order to shed light on the impact of individual characteristics on retirement and late careers. The growing inequality in late careers can be observed due to the limited support offered by the welfare regime and the decision to leave or to stay in employment seems more likely to be driven by structural factors than individual preferences in Estonia.

Keywords

  • Labor Market
  • Employment Rate
  • Early Retirement
  • Pension System
  • Welfare Regime

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 3.1
Fig. 3.2

Notes

  1. 1.

    The statutory retirement age in 1989 was 55 for women and 60 for men.

  2. 2.

    Authors’ own calculations based on Adult Education Survey 2007.

  3. 3.

    Non-Estonians comprise 30 % of the Estonian population. Most are Russians (25 %). In the 50+ age group, the percentage of non-Estonians is even larger (35 %) (Statistics Estonia).

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Correspondence to Marge Unt .

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Unt, M., Saar, E. (2016). Determinants of Retirement and Late Careers in Estonia. In: Hofäcker, D., Hess, M., König, S. (eds) Delaying Retirement. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56697-3_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56697-3_3

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