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Concepts: Analyzing the East European Radical Right

  • Michael Minkenberg
Chapter
Part of the Europe in Crisis book series (EIC)

Abstract

After a discussion of alternative terms and concepts such as fascism or populism, the author develops an operational definition of the “radical right” as exclusivist ultranationalism, grounded in modernization theory. He argues that this term can best capture the various actors on the far right in all parts of (democratic) Europe, covering party as well as non-party or movement-type actors. Despite the different contexts in which the radical right has operated in Eastern Europe up until today (the ramifications of the political transformation), as compared with its counterpart in Western Europe (the post-industrial context), a distinctly “East European” concept for these actors is not necessary. The chapter concludes with the presentation of an analytical model for studying the role of the radical right in the political process and its political impact.

Keywords

Ultranationalism Populism Extremism Modernization Process model 

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Minkenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Frankfurt/OderGermany

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