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The Linguistic Construction of Europeanness, Nationalism and Sexuality in ESC Performances

  • Heiko Motschenbacher
Chapter
Part of the Postdisciplinary Studies in Discourse book series (PSDS)

Abstract

The previous chapters have demonstrated how language choice and code-switching practices in the ESC are involved in national, transnational European and, to some extent, sexual identity construction. Chap.  5 extends these analyses by taking a more comprehensive look at how these three identity facets, and their interrelation , are linguistically constructed in ESC performances. The constructive mechanisms pertaining to Europeanness, nationalism and sexuality in ESC performances will first be outlined and then illustrated with examples.

Keywords

Female Gender Male Gender Grammatical Gender Masculine Grammatical Gender Feminine Grammatical Gender 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heiko Motschenbacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Goethe-University Frankfurt am MainFrankfurtGermany

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