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Collaborative Governance and the Third Sector: Something Old, Something New

Abstract

The third sector is one of the main partners for European governments in policy development and implementation. However, the relationship has often been a delicate one, touching on issues of autonomy and legitimacy. In this chapter, we give an overview of different theoretical reasons for and types of collaboration between the third sector and the state. We also describe the different traditions of collaboration that have emerged across Europe. Finally, we discuss the risks associated with this kind of relationship.

Keywords

  • Collaborative Governance
  • Classical Public Administration
  • Public Service Delivery
  • Brandsen
  • Sector Organizations

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Fig. 16.1

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Correspondence to Taco Brandsen .

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Brandsen, T., Johnston, K. (2018). Collaborative Governance and the Third Sector: Something Old, Something New. In: Ongaro, E., Van Thiel, S. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Public Administration and Management in Europe. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-55269-3_16

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