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Cultural Specificity and Globalization

  • Andrew Dorman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter situates the subjects of cultural specificity and Japanese cinema in the context of late twentieth-/early twenty-first-century globalization and the impact this phenomenon has had on cultural representation. As discussed, cultural representation can take on many forms to articulate the disorientating effects of globalization and adapt to an increasingly diverse and interconnected film industry and global film market. The chapter also considers the study of Japanese cinema as a distinctive national cinema, the cultural specificity of which has been essentialized. Such an approach, as will become apparent, poses certain limitations, particularly when discussing national/cultural representation in the contexts of globalization.

Keywords

National Identity Cultural Specificity Cultural Representation Film Production Film Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Dorman
    • 1
  1. 1.AuldgirthUK

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