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Cultural Images and Definitions of Homeless Women: Implications for Policy and Practice at the European Level

  • Cecilia Hansen Löfstrand
  • Deborah Quilgars
Chapter

Abstract

Chapter 3 focuses on how ideas about gender and homelessness impact on homelessness policies, services and the situation of homeless women in Europe. The power of culturally specific definitions and images of homelessness is significant. Access to homelessness services and chances of women exiting homelessness appear to be conditional upon the perceived conduct of women in many European countries. The design and organization of services for homeless women, which are to a large extent based on gendered stereotypes, may serve to alienate women. There is a need for a European-wide research on homelessness and housing services for women that is participatory in orientation and privileges women’s experiences, to develop services that respect the autonomy and dignity of women. Equally, there is a need for policies that focus on women’s access to affordable housing and socio-economic opportunities and their rights, more broadly.

Keywords

Welfare State Gender Stereotype Housing Policy Homeless People Housing Situation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Work ScienceUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  2. 2.Centre for Housing PolicyUniversity of YorkYorkUK

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