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Science and Geography Textbooks in Light of Subject-Specific Education

  • Péter Bagoly-Simó
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses research on textbooks with regard to the process of subject-specific teaching and learning in five subjects, namely, biology, physics, chemistry, science and geography. Given the heterogeneity of educational resources used in mathematics, engineering and technology, the focus remains on science rather than on STEM in its entirety. Its aims are twofold. On the one hand, it explores methods used in textbook research. On the other hand, it takes a closer look at the main theoretical foundation for textbook research in the five subject-specific education fields. The results show that content-related work still dominates research on textbooks. In addition, textbook usage has gradually gained importance as theories of teaching and learning entered subject-specific education.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Péter Bagoly-Simó
    • 1
  1. 1.Humboldt-Unversität zu BerlinBerlinGermany

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