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Faith in Ruins: Fragments and Pattern in the Late Works of Rose Macaulay

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Modernist Women Writers and Spirituality
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Abstract

This chapter explores a radical spiritual indeterminacy present throughout the work of Rose Macaulay and the way in which this is manifested through the recurring tropes of androgyny, amphibious life and ruins. These literary devices enable Macaulay to present a bifurcated vision of faith and identity that is troubling to many of her Christian critics who wish to present Macaulay as a spiritual seeker who eventually found a secure home within the Church. Although modernist scholars have been celebrating her ambivalent and polyvalent writing, they have been less willing to acknowledge its religious elements. Through a reading of Macaulay’s later work, I display the spiritual significance of her literary and personal decision to dwell amongst the ruins of faith.

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Walton, H. (2016). Faith in Ruins: Fragments and Pattern in the Late Works of Rose Macaulay. In: Anderson, E., Radford, A., Walton, H. (eds) Modernist Women Writers and Spirituality. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-53036-3_5

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