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Teaching History Master Narratives: Fostering Imagi-Nations

Abstract

Carretero discusses how people in present societies represent historical master narratives in and out of school. His argument is developed in relation to current problems of school history teaching and learning and to citizenship issues. Some psychological and educational approaches, such as Egan’s ideas about narrative development, are considered. In this vein, master narratives are analyzed in terms of five common features, which help to understand how school master narratives contribute to imagining the own nation, following Anderson’s classical idea of imagined communities. These features involve a selected historical subject, an identification process, a simplified common plot, moral vectors, and an essentialist concept of nation. Upon investigating these features, citizens were found to develop a less nationalistic interpretation of foundational narratives when they are not about their own nation.

Keywords

  • Iberian Peninsula
  • Historical Narrative
  • Historical Content
  • Historical Explanation
  • Master Narrative

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This paper has been written with the support of Projects EDU2013-42531P and EDU2015-65088-P from the DGICYT (Ministry of Education, Spain) and also the Project PICT2012-1594 from the ANPCYT (Argentina) coordinated by the author. Also this work was conducted within the framework of COST Action IS1205 “Social psychological dynamics of historical representations in the enlarged European Union”.

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Carretero, M. (2017). Teaching History Master Narratives: Fostering Imagi-Nations . In: Carretero, M., Berger, S., Grever, M. (eds) Palgrave Handbook of Research in Historical Culture and Education. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-52908-4_27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-52908-4_27

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