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Ireland in an International Comparative Context

  • Joanna Perry
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Hate Studies book series (PAHS)

Abstract

In Europe’s legal landscape, Ireland cuts a lonely figure in respect to hate crime. While its fellow European Union member states almost without exception have some kind of hate crime law, Ireland remains without a legislative framework to understand and address targeted violence motivated by prejudice. This surely isn’t because hate crime doesn’t exist in the country. Perennial reports by the European Network Against Racism, Ireland, evidence disturbing incidents of racist violence and abuse (see for example ENAR Ireland 2014) yet the Irish government maintains that its current legal framework, and judicial discretion are sufficient to effectively recognise and combat the problem. Of course law is not the only answer to combating hate.

Keywords

Racial Discrimination Framework Decision Hate Crime Hate Speech Irish Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanna Perry
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Criminal Policy ResearchUniversity of LondonBirkbeckEngland

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