Advertisement

Emerging Economies and BRICS Climate Policy: The Justifying Role of Media

  • Dmitry Yagodin
  • Débora Medeiros
  • Li Ji
  • Ibrahim Saleh
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter looks at an alliance of emerging economies (the BRICS countries) as a useful framework to study the media's role in justifying environmental policies in light of the IPCC report. It also looks at the usefulness of applying the BRICS concept to the contexts of economic growth and climate change. The climate strategies that are publicly discussed in the BRICS countries constitute the basis for future climate negotiations and geopolitical positioning. A key question then becomes: how does the media represent and justify existing and potential national climate policies with regard to the IPCC findings? To answer this question, the chapter considers two factors: the realities of the existing national media systems and the natural urge to minimize any threats to national economic growth. The empirical analysis focuses on media coverage of the IPCC reports (content analysis of the voices mentioned in the media texts and comparison of thematic representations across the selected countries).

Keywords

Climate Policy Media Coverage Climate Negotiation BRICS Country IPCC Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Bibliography

  1. Ackerman, F., & Stanton, E. A. (2008). The cost of climate change: What we’ll pay if global warming continues unchecked. Released by Natural Resources Defense Council. Retrieved from http://www.nrdc.org/globalwarming/cost/cost.pdf
  2. Andonova, L., & Alexieva, A. (2012). Continuity and change in Russia’s climate negotiations position and strategy. Climate Policy, 12(5), 614–629.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Becker, U. (2013). The BRICs and emerging economies in comparative perspective: Political economy, liberalisation and institutional change. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. BRICS. (2015, April 22). BRICS to establish a working group on environmental protection. Official website of Russia’s presidency in BRICS. Retrieved from http://en.brics2015.ru/news/20150422/62265.html
  5. Clark, D. (2011). Which nations are most responsible for climate change? The Guardian, 21 April. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/apr/21/countries-responsible-climate-change?
  6. de Albuquerque, A. (2012). On models and margins: Comparative media models viewed from a Brazilian perspective. In D. C. Hallin & P. Mancini (Eds.), Comparing media systems beyond the Western World (pp. 72–95). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. de Coning, C., Mandrup, T., & Odgaard, L. (2014). The BRICS and coexistence: An alternative vision of world order. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. d’Essen, C. (2010). Brazil: COP15 as a political platform. In E. Eide, R. Kunelius, & V. Kumpu (Eds.), Global climate, local journalisms: A transnational study of how media make sense of climate summits (pp. 83–96). Bochum: Projekt Verlag.Google Scholar
  9. EDGAR. (2013). CO2 time series 1990–2013 per capita for world countries. EDGAR Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research, European Commission. Retrieved from http://edgar.jrc.ec.europa.eu/overview.php?v=CO2ts_pc1990-2013
  10. Germanwatch. (2015). Global climate risk index 2015. Released by Germanwatch.org. Retrieved from http://germanwatch.org/en/download/10333.pdf
  11. Hadland, A. (2012). Africanizing three models of media and politics: The South African experience. In D. C. Hallin & P. Mancini (Eds.), Comparing media systems beyond the Western World (pp. 96–118). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Hallin, D. C., & Mancini, P. (2004). Comparing media systems: Three models of media and politics. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hallin, D. C., & Mancini, P. (2012). Comparing media systems beyond the Western World. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  14. International Monetary Fund. (2013). World economic outlook database. Released by IMF. Retrieved from http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/weo/2015/01/weodata/index.aspx
  15. ITU. (2013). Global ICT developments. Released by International Telecommunication Union. Retrieved from http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
  16. Jakubowicz, K. (2007). Rude awakening: Social and media change in Central and Eastern Europe. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.Google Scholar
  17. Leal-Arcas, R. (2013). The BRICS and climate change. International Affairs Forum, 4(1), 22–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lee, T. M., Markowitz, E. M., Howe, P. D., Ko, C.-Y., & Leiserowitz, A. A. (2015). Predictors of public climate change awareness and risk perception around the world. Nature Climate Change, 5, 1014–1020.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Liu, S. (2011). Structuration of information control in China. Cultural Sociology, 5(3), 323–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. ND-GAIN. (2013). The Notre Dame global adaptation index. Retrieved from http://index.gain.org/matrix
  21. Nordenstreng, K., & Thussu, D. K. (2015). Mapping BRICS media. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. O’Neill, J. (2001). Building better global economic BRICs. Global Economics Paper No. 66, released by Goldman Sachs. Retrieved from http://www.goldmansachs.com/our-thinking/archive/archive-pdfs/build-better-brics.pdf
  23. Orgeret, K. S., & d’Essen, C. (2012). From COP15 to COP17. Popular versus quality newspapers: Comparing Brazil and South Africa. A question of social responsibility? In E. Eide & R. Kunelius (Eds.), Media meets climate: The global challenge for journalism (pp. 263–280). Göteborg, Sweden: Nordicom.Google Scholar
  24. Poberezhskaya, M. (2015). Media coverage of climate change in Russia: Governmental bias and climate silence. Public Understanding of Science, 24(1), 96–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Reporters Without Borders. (2015). World press freedom index. Released by Reporters Without Borders. Retrieved from http://index.rsf.org/#x0023;!/index-details
  26. Roudakova, N. (2008). Media-political clientelism: Lessons from anthropology. Media, Culture & Society, 30(1), 41–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Rowe, E. W. (2012). International science, domestic politics: Russian reception of international climate-change assessments. Environment & Planning D: Society & Space, 30(4), 711–726.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Saleh, I. (2012). Ups and downs from Cape to Cairo: The journalistic practice of climate change in Africa. In E. Eide & R. Kunelius (Eds.), Media meets climate: The global challenge for journalism (pp. 49–65). Göteborg: Nordicom.Google Scholar
  29. Schreiner, W., & Bosman, J. (2012). Coverage cop-out: Global media analysis points to a lack of climate change coverage. Ecquid Novi: African Journalism Studies, 33(1), 66–71.Google Scholar
  30. Sparks, C. (2014). Deconstructing the BRICS. International Journal of Communication, 8, 392–418.Google Scholar
  31. Statistics Norway. (2013). Statistisk sentralbyrå. Retrieved from http://www.ssb.no/en/
  32. Straubhaar, J. (2015). BRICS as emerging cultural and media powers. In K. Nordenstreng & D. K. Thussu (Eds.), Mapping BRICS media (pp. 87–103). New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  33. UN Development Programme. (2013). Human development reports by United Nations Development Programme. Retrieved from http://hdr.undp.org/en/content/table-1-human-development-index-and-its-components
  34. Vartanova, E. (2012). The Russian media model in the context of Post-Soviet dynamics. In D. C. Hallin & P. Mancini (Eds.), Comparing media systems beyond the Western World (pp. 119–142). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Wu, F. (2012). Sino–Indian climate cooperation: Implications for the international climate change regime. Journal of Contemporary China, 21(77), 827–843.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Xu, P. (2010). China: Emerging player with a historical legacy. In E. Eide, R. Kunelius, & V. Kumpu (Eds.), Global climate, local journalisms: A transnational study of how media make sense of climate summits (pp. 131–145). Bochum: Projekt Verlag.Google Scholar
  37. Zhao, Y. (2012). Understanding China’s media system in a world historical context. In D. C. Hallin & P. Mancini (Eds.), Comparing media systems beyond the Western World (pp. 143–173). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dmitry Yagodin
    • 1
  • Débora Medeiros
    • 2
  • Li Ji
    • 3
  • Ibrahim Saleh
    • 4
  1. 1.School of Communication, Media and TheatreUniversity of TampereTampereFinland
  2. 2.Institute for Communication and Media StudiesFree University of BerlinBerlinGermany
  3. 3.School of Journalism and CommunicationWuhan UniversityWuhanChina
  4. 4.Political Communication DepartmentCairo UniversityCairoEgypt

Personalised recommendations