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Meat

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Abstract

This chapter argues that the most common way in which animals are encountered on television is when they are dead, as meat. It therefore explores practices of cooking and the ways in which cultures normalise meat-eating as an activity. It points to the large number of cookery programmes on television, and signals the significance of these given the medium’s domestic functions align with cookery as a domestic activity. For its analysis it draws on strands of feminism that see parallels between the exploitation of women and animals, whereby living beings are constructed as pieces of meat to be consumed. The chapter ends with a case study of a Jamie Oliver cookery programme, showing how this series, while attentive to debates about animal welfare, functions to justify meat-eating as a normal and legitimate activity.

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  • DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-51683-1_6
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Mills, B. (2017). Meat. In: Animals on Television. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-51683-1_6

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