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Abstract

Zoe Marks unpacks the black box of gender dynamics in rebel groups and insurgent organizations in contemporary armed conflict. Examining how roles, responsibilities, and social relations are distributed and negotiated between men and women in rebellion reveals how these organizations survive and function, and sharpens our understanding of the spectrum of combatant experiences in wartime. Marks examines cross-national comparative data on participation patterns in rebellion, before turning to the group level to explore gendered power structures and role allocation in armed conflict. The chapter concludes with micro-level analysis that explores variations in individual experiences of violence and vulnerability inside rebellion.

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Marks, Z. (2017). Gender Dynamics in Rebel Groups. In: Woodward, R., Duncanson, C. (eds) The Palgrave International Handbook of Gender and the Military. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-51677-0_27

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