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Designing and Directing Adaptations

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture book series (PSADVC)

Abstract

This chapter first offers a contextual introduction to the relevant concepts and debates of both television studies and adaptation studies in understanding the work of the production designer and the director on television adaptations. The chapter then provides four original, full-length interviews with British production designers and directors who have worked extensively on television adaptation projects, followed by an analysis of the key themes emerging from the interviews. For example: creative collaborations, materialising television adaptations, and a personal perspective on industry changes concerning equality and diversity from a female television director.

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Correspondence to Christopher Hogg .

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Hogg, C. (2021). Designing and Directing Adaptations. In: Adapting Television Drama. Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-50177-6_4

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