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Writing Adaptations

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture book series (PSADVC)

Abstract

This chapter first offers a contextual introduction to the relevant concepts and debates of both television studies and adaptation studies in understanding the work of the screenwriter on television adaptations. The chapter then provides four original, full-length interviews with British screenwriters who have worked extensively on television adaptation projects, followed by an analysis of the key themes emerging from the interviews. For example: working with literary sources, writerly notions of “fidelity”, showrunner status, and broader industry adaptations affecting television screenwriters today.

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  • DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-50177-6_3
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Correspondence to Christopher Hogg .

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Hogg, C. (2021). Writing Adaptations. In: Adapting Television Drama. Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-50177-6_3

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