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Producing Adaptations

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture book series (PSADVC)

Abstract

This chapter first offers a contextual introduction to the relevant concepts and debates of both television studies and adaptation studies in understanding the work of the producer on television adaptations. The chapter then provides four original, full-length interviews with British executive producers who have worked extensively on television adaptation projects, followed by an analysis of the key themes emerging from the interviews. For example: the importance of titles, producerly notions of “fidelity”, negotiating authorship within adaptation productions, and broader industry adaptations affecting television producers today.

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  • DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-50177-6_2
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Correspondence to Christopher Hogg .

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Hogg, C. (2021). Producing Adaptations. In: Adapting Television Drama. Palgrave Studies in Adaptation and Visual Culture. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-50177-6_2

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