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Some Essential Themes in Building the Case for Captions in Language Learning

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Captioned Media in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching

Part of the book series: New Language Learning and Teaching Environments ((NLLTE))

Abstract

The conference, “Subtitles and Language Learning,” held at the University of Pavia in September 2012, brought together, on the one hand, translation researchers and professionals and, on the other hand, those of us who have spent years promoting same-language subtitles or “captions” for the deaf and hard-of-hearing people as a valuable aid to foreign and second language learning. It marked not only a watershed but also a “coming out,” as captioning has now spread beyond the UK and North America, and has the backing of the European Union (EU) as a multilingual means of supporting its accessibility and equality agenda beyond the deaf and hard-of-hearing people. We also heard about the findings of a large-scale survey (reported in detail in Chap. 8), which confirmed the importance of captions for second language viewers, especially migrant workers and adult expatriate learners of host country’s languages. While the recognition by the EU that captioned viewing may help to bring the reality of a multilingual Europe a step closer for millions of its citizens, the history of captioning, particularly outside North America and the UK, is relatively short, and the nature and value of captions for second language users and learners is still not widely appreciated despite the large research literature on the value of captioned viewing worldwide. In this chapter, I shall try to build a unique position for the captioned viewing of TV programmes and films between the two large and well-established professional areas: those involved in translating films and TV programmes, and those who specialise in language teaching using TV and video.

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Vanderplank, R. (2016). Some Essential Themes in Building the Case for Captions in Language Learning. In: Captioned Media in Foreign Language Learning and Teaching. New Language Learning and Teaching Environments. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-50045-8_2

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