Narrative Subject: Between Continuity and Transformation

  • Julia Vassilieva
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses the issue of stability and change of personality, self and identity through the prism of narrative theorization. The chapter begins by sketching the context of discussion of the issues of personality stability and change in academic psychology. It then outlines a range of positions in literary studies on the issue of narrative continuity. Narrative, change and self are thus positioned as connected by a matrix of functional links that create a range of possibilities in thinking through the issue of change. The chapter then demonstrates how some of these possibilities are realized in McAdams’s model of identity as a life story, Hermans’s dialogical self theory, and White and Epston’s narrative therapy.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Vassilieva
    • 1
  1. 1.Monash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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