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The Production of Children’s Voices

  • Spyros Spyrou
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Childhood and Youth book series (SCY)

Abstract

This chapter critiques the preoccupation with children’s voices in childhood studies and the unexamined assumptions about the authenticity and truth that children’s voices represent. Using poststructuralist insights, the chapter reflects on the interactional contexts in which children’s voices emerge, the institutional contexts in which they are embedded, and the discursive contexts which inform them in order to critically assess questions of representation. Using Bakhtin’s dialogical approach, and turning to the performative, multi-layered character of voice and to its non-normative elements like silence, the chapter suggests that more sensitive and ethical accounts of children’s subjectivities may be provided through a relational, decentered lens.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social and Behavioral SciencesEuropean University CyprusNicosiaCyprus

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