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Finding Knowledge

  • Ane Ohrvik
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic book series (PHSWM)

Abstract

Chapter 1 introduces the Black Books as early modern manuscripts of knowledge and places them within three corresponding fields of research: magic; book history; and the history of knowledge. While the first represents the classical context within which the books have been placed, book history and the history of knowledge introduce new ways of contextualising, viewing and interpreting the Black Books, which was the motivating ambition for the book. Furthermore, the chapter describes and discusses paratext as the general theoretical and methodical perspective applied in the study. Finally, it outlines the principles behind the selection of material and how it is presented.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ane Ohrvik
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OsloOsloNorway

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